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Cato CRUD Generator

I just released my Cato CRUD Generator software tool. Cato is a software code generator that is 1) template-driven, 2) independent of programming language or tool, 3) customizable, and 4) hopefully very easy for developers to install and use.

The Cato CRUD Generator

Just a quick note here that I've created a website for my Cato CRUD Generator app. Cato is a template based code generator that works with any programming language or tool, including Java, PHP, XML, Spring Framework, Drupal, and pretty much any other programming tool.

As you'll see on that website, Cato is a simple PHP app, and after you take about a minute to configure the connection to your database, Cato is ready to start generating source code based on your database table definitions.

Win a free copy of Introducing HTML5

Would you like to win a free copy of a terrific HTML5 programming book?

Over on the devdaily.com website I'm giving away a free copy of Introducing HTML5. Please see that URL for more contest and prize information.

If you're a computer programmer you've probably seen this book in the bookstores. Here's what it looks like:

How a business analyst moves from business documents to software design

As a business analyst, I'm always asked how I get from (a) having absolutely nothing but a project charter or mission statement to (b) having a complete design of a software system. People are amazed that just by talking (and working together) we can build a terrific computer software system that meets their needs.

New IIBA member

Back in the fall of 2006 I participated in meetings related to the International Institute of Business Analysis, or IIBA, in Louisville, Kentucky. It started when I gave a series of presentations on Function Point Analysis, eXtreme Programming, and Agile programming, and as it turned out, other business analysts were in the audience at those presentations.

Java Xeyes app (for Mac OS X systems)

I just released my Java Xeyes application, which you can download using the link below. If you've used the old Unix/X-Windows "xeyes" application, you'll know what this app does. If not, here's a link to a one-minute YouTube video that demonstrates how this works:

A Mac Java version of "Xeyes"

If you're familiar with the old Xeyes program from the early Unix days, you'll know it as a pair of "eyes" on screen that watch you as you work. Technically, all they do is follow the mouse cursor around the screen, but they make it feel like they're watching you work.

For a little fun this weekend I created a Java version of Xeyes that runs on Mac OS X systems. For lack of a better name, I'm currently calling this Mac application "Java Xeyes", or "Jeyes". Here's a little one-minute video I put together to demonstrate this app:

Business analysis and software requirements - What is a 'user'?

When working as a business analyst several users ago, I had an amazing experience when I very casually asked a client something like, "What requirements do you want to put on passwords for external users?"

Several weeks later we decided what we meant by "external user", had redefined "internal user", learned that their company had at least four different customer applications with four different user databases, and my company gave them a presentation on LDAP systems and identity management.

Alaska business analyst consulting services

On this website I mostly write about computer programming and website design, because those are things a lot of small business clients here in Colorado can relate to. But as any computer programmer that has been involved in a multi-million dollar software project can tell you, creating software is about much more than just computer programming. Many other steps are required, including:

A multiline Linux Bash command prompt

Now that I have Linux shell accounts on at least seven different servers, I've changed my Bash login prompt on each server so I can easily see what server I'm logged in to. For instance, on my Valley Programming web server, my command prompt looks like this:

VALPRO:/home/al
> _

With this prompt, the "VALPRO" part reminds me that I'm logged into my Valley Programming server, and the path shown to the right of it changes as I move from one directory to another. I actually type my command on the line beneath that, where the underscore character is shown.

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